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Handsome Toussian Loniake Mask 41.5
Handsome Toussian Loniake Mask 41.5
Handsome Toussian Loniake Mask 41.5
Handsome Toussian Loniake Mask 41.5
Handsome Toussian Loniake Mask 41.5
Handsome Toussian Loniake Mask 41.5
Handsome Toussian Loniake Mask 41.5
Handsome Toussian Loniake Mask 41.5
Handsome Toussian Loniake Mask 41.5
Handsome Toussian Loniake Mask 41.5
Handsome Toussian Loniake Mask 41.5
Handsome Toussian Loniake Mask 41.5

Handsome Toussian Loniake Mask 41.5″ – Burkina Faso – African Art

$350.00 $140.00

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SKU: 1003183 Categories: , , ,
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This Toussian Loniake mask is a handsome piece of artwork. Usually Loniake masks are square in the body, however, this piece takes on the form of the birds wings, making it visually unique. This mask will hang easily on a wall but we offer custom stands for floor or table display – inquire for more information.

Type of Object

Mask

Country of Origin

Burkina Faso

Ethnicity

Toussian (Tussian)

Approximate Age

Unknown

Height (Inches)

41.5"

Width (Inches)

23.5"

Depth (Inches)

7"

Weight (Pounds/ Ounces)

11 lbs

Overall Condition

The bird's head on top is loose. Minor imperfections and wear and tear. Inquire for more information.

Tribe Information

About the Tussian People

“The various tribes living in Burkina Faso (formerly Upper-Volta), Ghana and Togo cultivate millet and cotton, and rear cattle in the northern savannah regions. Their religious activities are dictated by the rhythm of the seasons – during the dry season in particular, when the fields are fallow, large festivals and ceremonies are organized.
The 22,000 Tussian people of south-west Burkina Faso carved masks called Loniake – a square plank of wood pierced with two eyes surmounted by the clan’s emblem: a pair of horns or a bird’s head. These masks were worn during initiation ceremonies.
Tussian headdresses, called Kable, are stylistically influenced by the Senufo. They are used during rites associated with the purification of villages and at funerals. Often, they have an oily patina resulting from numerous libations of palm oil.

Source:
Baquart, Jean-Baptiste. The Tribal Arts of Africa. New York: Thames and Hudson Inc. 1998. Print.