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Sitting Dogon Bronze Statue Holding Bowl
Sitting Dogon Bronze Statue Holding Bowl
Sitting Dogon Bronze Statue Holding Bowl
Sitting Dogon Bronze Statue Holding Bowl
Sitting Dogon Bronze Statue Holding Bowl
Sitting Dogon Bronze Statue Holding Bowl
Sitting Dogon Bronze Statue Holding Bowl
Sitting Dogon Bronze Statue Holding Bowl
Sitting Dogon Bronze Statue Holding Bowl
Sitting Dogon Bronze Statue Holding Bowl
Sitting Dogon Bronze Statue Holding Bowl
Sitting Dogon Bronze Statue Holding Bowl

Sitting Dogon Bronze Statue Holding Bowl from Mali – 14″

$195.00 $78.00

1 in stock

SKU: 1008304 Categories: , ,
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Sitting Dogon Bronze Statue Holding Bowl

The Dogon are known for their geometric style of the human form. A Dogon statue such as this, has primitive and elongated features that display these characteristics of their art form.This piece is unique because it has a small bowl resting on its lap.

Dogon History

The Dogon people are believed to have originated in ancient Egypt while settling along the sandstone cliffs by the Bandiagara Escarpment probably during the 15th or 16th century.  It is thought that they ended up here while trying to escape Islamization. With bluffs reaching over 1600 feet high and 90 miles long, and the cliffs littered with hundreds of caves, it would have been the perfect place to hide from enemies.

Dogon Legend

Dogon people have become popularized for their ancient tales on human origins and extraterrestrial contact. According to legend, a race of beings called Nommo, came from the star system Sirius, thousands of years ago. The beings are said to have come to Earth to provide humans with knowledge.  They gave the Dogon information about their solar system as well as our own. These same creatures also appear in Babylonian and Sumerian myths.

Oddly, the Dogon people did had knowledge for centuries that were, until Galileo and his telescope, unknown to the Western world. They identified Jupiter’s moons and Saturn’s rings and knew that the Sun was the center of our solar system. They have stories about the big bang and other astronomical events. The Dogon people had awareness about an invisible companion star orbiting Sirius that was unidentified until 1970. It baffles scientists to this day that an ancient race had knowledge of solar systems that cannot be seen without the help of high-powered telescopes.

You can learn more about the Dogon people by visiting our Dogon tribe page here.

Interested in seeing another Dogon bronze statue? Visit our Dogon shop page here.

Type of Object

Bronze Figure

Country of Origin

Mali

Ethnicity

Dogon

Material

Copper Alloy

Approximate Age

Unknown

Height (Inches)

14"

Width (Inches)

2.5"

Depth (Inches)

2.5"

Weight (Pounds)

2lbs

Overall Condition

Good

Additional Information

Lost-Wax Casting Method

Tribe Information

About the Dogon People

The Dogon have become popularized for their ancient tales on human origins and extraterrestrial contact. According to legend, a race of beings called Nommo, came from the star system Sirius, thousands of years ago. The beings are said to have come to Earth and provided humans with knowledge.  They gave the Dogon information about their solar system as well as our own. These same creatures also appear in Babylonian and Sumerian myths.

Oddly, the Dogon did have knowledge for centuries that were, until Galileo and his telescope, unknown to the Western world. They identified Jupiter’s moons and Saturn’s rings and knew that the Sun was the center of our solar system. They have stories about the big bang and other astronomical events. They had awareness about an invisible companion star orbiting Sirius that was unidentified until 1970. It baffles scientists to this day that an ancient race had knowledge of solar systems that cannot be seen without the help of high-powered telescopes.

Read more about the Dogon here.

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Additional Information

About Lost-Wax Casting Method

In-direct lost wax casting is the most basic form of metal casting seen in African cultures. Scholars have yet to establish exactly how it was introduced and developed in West African regions, but it is known that it was being used prior to Portuguese explorers’ arrival in the late 1400’s.
To use this method, the artist must begin with a low melting point material that can retain its shape but is soft enough to carve intricate details into, such as beeswax. Once the artist finishes carving the details, layers of clay are applied to the outside and then left to dry. The first layer of clay applied takes on the details, while the additional layers of coarser clay provide strength to the entirety of the mold. Once fired, the wax is then melted, leaving only the baked clay shell. Liquid metal is then poured into the empty clay mold. Once the metal has hardened and cooled, the clay exterior is then broken. This process reveals the finished metal object, which is always unique due to the mold being destroyed during the final process.
Many West African sculptors have altered this method by using multiple castings, which can be used to create hollowed and thin metal figures. One of the ways to achieve the hollowed result is creating the wax sculptures over a formed clay core. Iron spikes are used to attach the solid clay core to the clay layers of the mold. The metal is then poured inside and left to cool and hardened. At the end of the process, the clay core is then broken up and removed and the final brass work is finished. These hollowed pieces can then be united to create larger figures or vessels.

Source:
Apley, Alice. (2001, October) African Lost-Wax Casting Essay. http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/wax/hd_wax.htm